Goal

AMYPAD aims to determine the value of ß-amyloid imaging as a diagnostic and therapeutic marker for Alzheimer’s disease.

3 main project objectives

Click on each section below to find out more about the main AMYPAD project objectives.

Diagnostic value: Usefulness of ß-amyloid imaging in patient management Diagnostic study #1590AF First, the project aims at better understanding the impact of the utilization of amyloid PET imaging on diagnostic thinking and patient management.
AMYPAD will scan a large population cohort (n=900) suspected of possible Alzheimer’s disease, focusing on those with subjective cognitive decline (SCD), mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and atypical/unexplained dementia, to determine the usefulness of ß-amyloid imaging regarding diagnostic confidence, decision trees, change in diagnosis, and patient management plans. The primary objective is to measure the impact on patient management of early versus late utilization of amyloid PET imaging
Risk stratification: Natural history of disease and methods to enrich secondary prevention studies Prognostic study #2B599B Second, the project wants to follow up and understand the natural history of Alzheimer’s disease ranging from cognitively normal, through subjective cognitive decline towards mild cognitive impairment in order to define the optimal window of opportunity for secondary prevention of Alzheimer’s disease through ß-amyloid PET imaging.
To better understand the natural history of ß-amyloid pathophysiology, AMYPAD will leverage several Europe-wide networks in close collaboration with EPAD and other non-EPAD cohorts (e.g. EMIF-AD, ALFA+, and others), to study the earliest stages of Alzheimer’s disease in a longitudinal and multi-modal fashion.
Monitoring treatment: Quantifying patient-specific efficacy Proof of concept studies #514A89 Finally, AMYPAD will select people for treatment trials aiming at preventing Alzheimer’s disease by ensuring more homogeneous and appropriate enrolment.
The combined populations will be followed clinically and in up to 50% with longitudinal ß-amyloid imaging (focusing on those with borderline positive scans) to improve understanding of disease pathophysiology and establish relevant pre-trial information that will facilitate clinical trial inclusion, reduce required sample size and improve statistical power of the (imaging-related) outcomes. The ultimate goal is to establish predictors of decline to help in the planning and monitoring of treatment.
Diagnostic study First, the project aims at better understanding the impact of the utilization of amyloid PET imaging on diagnostic thinking and patient management.
AMYPAD will scan a large population cohort (n=900) suspected of possible Alzheimer’s disease, focusing on those with subjective cognitive decline (SCD), mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and atypical/unexplained dementia, to determine the usefulness of ß-amyloid imaging regarding diagnostic confidence, decision trees, change in diagnosis, and patient management plans. The primary objective is to measure the impact on patient management of early versus late utilization of amyloid PET imaging
About the AMYPAD study
 

Originally scheduled to be a 60-month project in total, beginning 1 October 2016 and ending September 2021, the Amyloid imaging to prevent Alzheimer’s disease (AMYPAD) project has been extended by 12 months to come to an end in September 2022. The project involves 15 academic and private research partners.

Led by VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, the AMYPAD consortium brings together a word-class team of highly synergistic partners from across Europe to form a pan- European network including the most active PET sites. This ensurse effective access to patients and also maximise exposure to technical knowledge and disease modelling.

To keep the project aligned with the current state-of-the-art of the field, regular interactions with external experts and complementary initiatives are taking place, allowing maximal leverage of novel knowledge into the AMYPAD project.